Recommended Reading: The War on Christmas

Since I couldn’t have said it better, I’ll urge you to read The War on Christmas by John Eidsmoe rather than try to summarize it for you here.  But just to get you started, here’s an excerpt:

Imagine, if you will, a gala birthday party given in your honor. The guests will sing, dance, give presents, eat, drink, and have the merriest of times.  The hitch: your name will not be mentioned, the gifts will not be for you, the celebrants won’t be thinking about you, and everyone would sort of prefer that you not come.

That’s all that will be left of Christmas if various groups have their way.  All across the country, this year as in the past several years, there has been a concerted drive to remove all vestiges of Christianity from the celebration of Christ’s birthday.  For example:

• Public schools increasingly call Christmas vacation something like “winter break.”

• Students and teachers are discouraged or prohibited from wishing each other “Merry Christmas,” preferring “Happy Holidays” or “Seasons Greetings” instead.

• Christmas trees are either banned or called “winter trees.”

• Public-school Christmas programs, er, pardon me, “winter programs,” go heavy on “Frosty the Snowman” and “Deck the Halls,” but the traditional Christmas carols are censored.

• Retail store employees are instructed to wish their customers “Happy Holidays” or “Seasons Greetings” rather than “Merry Christmas.”

• Retail catalogs tout their goods as perfect for “the season” but avoid mentioning Christ or Christmas.

• Christmas cards, if I may call them that, wish our friends the “joys of the season” but commonly omit the “Reason for the season.”

• Public buildings such as city halls, fire and police departments, etc., feature holiday displays with holly, reindeer, and candy canes, but no manger scenes and no Baby Jesus.

These practices are far from universal. But they are increasing, and they are part of a concerted drive to cleanse the public arena from any and all vestiges of America’s Judeo-Christian heritage.

John Eidsmoe is a retired Air Force lieutenant colonel, is a professor at the Oak Brook College of Law & Government Policy and serves as legal counsel for the Foundation for Moral Law.

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